Saturday, May 21, 2016

Geranium Study #1


In oil painting lately, I have been working on cleaner color, more brush marks and more painterly paintings. Here is my first 2016 geranium study. I kept the addition of white paint to the very end.

Wednesday, May 18, 2016

Fruit and Flowers

Fruit and Flowers/ 8 x 10/ oil on board
This study used a larger color palette. The dark in the background is ultramarine and transparent oxide red instead of the asphaltum in the previous posts. The greens are made from ultramarine and either lemon yellow, or cad yellow deep. Some yellow ochre or white is added to some of them. I have finally found inexpensive brushed that I love to paint with. After I abuse them a little more, I'll publish what they are.

Sunday, May 15, 2016

More Peony Studies

This is the third peony study that I have kept (many wipes). The background is thicker and thinner areas of asphaltum by Gamblin with an occasional addition of magenta or a mixed green. This was painted with a limited palette of cad yellow pale, cad red medium, magenta , ultramarine blue, titanium white and asphaltum. I found that I had to soften many of the edges that I had painted.












This is the fourth study. What is most interesting to me is that this is the same limited palette. This one is a higher key with little of the asphalt (added to some of the dark greens. I found that the deep parts of the flower cups worked best with warm mixtures.

Friday, May 13, 2016

Peony Study #2

Peonies, Iris and Rose Study/ oil on canvas board/ 9 x 12/ $215
Purchase here
This is my second peony study that I like (and have not wiped). While they last, I will paint them again. Their shape and color are especially challenging. I am looking forward to seeing whether Friday the 13th makes a good painting day. If not, there is always tomorrow.

Thursday, May 12, 2016

Round Objects

Thank you to the many of you who sent me a note after yesterday's post.
When I write these posts, I am not sure anyone receives them, so your notes are appreciated.

This little painting started as an exercise working on round objects (the mini watermelon and the brown egg). This image doesn't show the subtle warms that add dimension (light rose in the watermelon and yellows on the egg).  After painting the watermelon and egg, I liked them so much that I added a glass tea cup to complete a mini composition.
This is NOT the way to make a painting. I have wiped, painted over or just thrown out are tons of paintings without a clear idea of the light/dark pattern PRIOR to starting. This study also does not have a compelling (interesting) dark/light pattern. If you are one of my students reading this, go find a favorite painting and look at its value plan...Now think about a painting that you have been unhappy about and determine if the basic skeleton (value plan) of that painting isn't the issue.

Wednesday, May 11, 2016

Peony Study

Peony Study (that I like) oil on board/ 10 x 8/ $195
Purchase here
I haven't posted for quite a long time now.
I have been re-evaluating where I want my art adventure headed. I have been working on technical challenges to make some of my goals more achievable.
Here is the first oil flower study that I am happy with as I move forward. This has warm shadows and cool lights. It has mostly soft or lost edges and it has a great sense of warmth. This study might be number 6 in my learning series (all the rest are wipers). I have asked Michael O'brien
(Fishing Creek Flower Farm) if he might have some more peonies so that I can continue to work on this flower type. I have found that working from life is so much better than photographs (as everyone wise has always said). In the meanwhile, I am also struggling with roses...

Wednesday, April 13, 2016

Still Life Study


I have been working on cleaner, brighter paintings. Everything I read reminds me that a big problem with "chalky" or "muddy" paintings is painting inaccurate color temperature (Presently I am reminded of this because a horse I am working on keeps rolling in the dust....(in reality, I keep erroneously adding white to areas that should be warm...)).

To practice "warm" shadows and "cool" light, I set up a still life. I wiped out my shadows every time that I painted them "cool" (thinking "shadow= blue/grey" which is "cool" which is wrong) ("wipe")).  The  "cool" light allows use lots of white in the mixes in the lit areas ( remember that white "cools"...) and keep the white OUT of the shadow mixtures...Now back to the horse.